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Calig xxx

Calig xxx-35

He soon recovered from his illness, but many believed that the illness turned the young emperor toward the diabolical: he started to kill off or exile those who were close to him or whom he saw as a serious threat.Perhaps his illness reminded him of his mortality and of the desire of others to advance into his place.

Calig xxx-81Calig xxx-2Calig xxx-76

The conspirators' attempt to use the opportunity to restore the Roman Republic was thwarted, however.Cassius Dio said that this act "though delighting the rabble, grieved the sensible, who stopped to reflect, that if the offices should fall once more into the hands of the many ... Caligula's political payments for support, generosity and extravagance had exhausted the state's treasury.Ancient historians state that Caligula began falsely accusing, fining and even killing individuals for the purpose of seizing their estates.After this, the sources focus upon his cruelty, sadism, extravagance, and sexual perversion, presenting him as an insane tyrant.While the reliability of these sources is questionable, it is known that during his brief reign, Caligula worked to increase the unconstrained personal power of the emperor, as opposed to countervailing powers within the principate.Suetonius claims that Caligula was already cruel and vicious: he writes that, when Tiberius brought Caligula to Capri, his purpose was to allow Caligula to live in order that he "...

prove the ruin of himself and of all men, and that he was rearing a viper for the Roman people and a Phaethon for the world." When Tiberius died on 16 March 37 AD, his estate and the titles of the principate were left to Caligula and Tiberius's own grandson, Gemellus, who were to serve as joint heirs.

He aided those who lost property in fires, abolished certain taxes, and gave out prizes to the public at gymnastic events.

He allowed new members into the equestrian and senatorial orders.

In AD 38, Caligula focused his attention on political and public reform.

He published the accounts of public funds, which had not been made public during the reign of Tiberius.

He directed much of his attention to ambitious construction projects and luxurious dwellings for himself, and initiated the construction of two aqueducts in Rome: the Aqua Claudia and the Anio Novus.